Park City

Where to Stay at Park City

Written by Ron Thompson • Photos by Greg and Heather Burke • Last updated Oct 21, 2017

Where to Stay

There are three major areas where you can stay and walk to a lift: Historic Park City near the base of the Town Lift, The Park City base area, and The Canyons village. Thanks to the free transit system in town, lodging properties in other areas of Park City are viable (and often cheaper) options even if you don’t have a car. For those with cars, a much cheaper option is downtown Salt Lake City, which is only about a 30-minute drive.

Historic Park City

Main Street

Historic Park City and its Main Street is the best option for dining, nightlife, and shopping out of the three areas. It's filled with all the western charm of a bustling ski town, reminiscent of its origins as a 1800s mining outfit. From Old Town Park City, the mountain is only accessible via the Town Lift. 

Park City Base Area

The Park City base area is right at the edge of town but has easy access to most of the chair lifts going up the mountain – Payday Express, Crescent Express, First Time, 3 Kings and Eagle. Silver Star which is a bit more out of the way gives access to lodging in the Thaynes Canyon/Golf Course areas, and feeds into King Con Express to get skiers to the rest of the mountain. The Park City base area is roughly a mile away from Historic Park City and has a small market for the bare necessities.

Canyons Village

From Canyons Village, the Cabriolet gondola runs from one of the main parking areas to the base of the Red Pine gondola, and is not far from the base of Orange Bubble Express. Sunrise, Red Pine gondola, and Orange Bubble are all easily accessible from lodging and shops in the Canyons Village. The Canyons Village is quieter and has more upscale options and also has a small market for basics in the Westgate building. 

Getting Around the Resort

To get you to all of that, there is a free in-town bus system with many stops and routes, with most routes running from 7am to 9pm on 20-minute intervals. Along with Aspen, it might be one of the best free resort transit systems for any ski resort. During peak times, you might have to stand but aside from that, it’s generally not terribly crowded. Travel times will vary but you could expect a trip from Main Street in Park City to the transit hub in Canyons Village to take somewhere around 15 minutes.

If it’s after hours, or you shredded so hard you don’t even want to walk from shuttle stops to where you’re going, there is taxi service running 24 hours a day. There are multiple providers; one of them, Xpress4Less, lists its one-way fares within Park City proper as $12 on average. Of course, there’s also Uber, which lists a ride from the Park City transportation hub to the center of Canyons Village as $9. Uber technically runs 24 hours, but the number of drivers available isn’t consistent, so sometimes it might be a long wait. There can also sometimes be surge pricing during peak travel periods.

If you have a rental car, Kimball Junction (where you got off the interstate on your way in) has “normal” food and supply shopping options. Another pro-tip: since it’s Utah, and Utah has some strange laws, don’t plan on trying to stock up on alcohol on a Sunday.

Parking

The Park City base area has a large parking lot with easy access to several lifts, but it often fills up by 10pm; it also has paid underground parking. Canyons Village has an even larger parking lot that rarely fills, but you have to take the Cabriolet gondola, which sometimes has a long line. There is paid ($20) parking in a small lot near the Canyons Village Sundial Lodge, which requires a short walk to the Sunrise lift or a longer walk to the Red Pine Gondola or Orange Bubble. Overflow parking is at the Park City High School.

Ski Resorts in Salt Lake City